Assignment 7: Basic Sewing


Creating a Reversible Tote

Materials

Materials Required

This project requires fabric, sewing machine, iron, scissors, pins and thread.

Step 1

Step 1

Pre-wash and dry fabric. I chose 100% cotton for this project. I selected colors and patterns that would not only look nice together but also provide contrast between the outer side and the lining of the tote.

Step 2

Step 2

Iron the fabric to prepare for cutting out pieces using pattern.

Step

Step 3

Using pattern, cut out two 4″ x 22″ pieces. Fold in half and press.

Step

Step 4

Open each piece and fold outer edge to the centre.

Step

Step 5

Then, fold in half and press.

Step

Step  6

Next, top stitch each strap.

Step 3

Step 7

Step 3 Continued

Step 7 Continued

Step 3 Continued

Step 7 Continued

Using pattern, cut two pieces (13 1/2″ X 14)  for tote outside and two pieces (13 1/2″ X 14″) for tote lining.

Step

Step 8

Step

Step 8 Continued

Pin and sew outer pieces right sides together on three sides. Do the same for the two lining pieces.

Step

Step 9

Step

Step 9 Continued

Step

Step 9 Continued

Pinch bottom corner together and stitch across 1 1/2″ from corner for two outer and two lining corners.

Step 10

Step 10

Place lining  inside the outer fabric right sides together. Place straps in between right sides of fabric on each side about 2 1/2″ from the side edge. Pins straps and top edge of tote. Stitch around top of tote 1/2″ edge. Leave a 2 1/2″ opening on the side for flipping tote right side out.

Step 11

Step 11

Flip bag right side out.

Step

Step 12

Step

Step 12 Continued

Push lining inside tote and top stitch all the way around the top of tote closing the opening left from flipping tote right side out.


Finished Product

Results

Reversible Tote Results

 

Results

Reversible Tote Results Continued

 

Results

Reversible Tote Results Continued

 

Results

Reversible Tote Results Continued

 

Results

Reversible Tote Results Continued

 

Note: I chose to not explicitly embellish this tote as it is for casual and practical use. It will be exposed to hard wear carting things around so I wanted it durable and without too many bells and whistles.


 

 

Sources for Instruction on Basic Sewing

“Tilly and the Buttons Dress Handmade: Learn to Sew” (http://www.tillyandthebuttons.com/p/learn-to-sew.html)

Sewing Handout (http://www.lovesewing.com/studenthandouts/isstudenthandouts.pdf)

Sewing Machine Parts and their Jobs Handout  (http://misspedeliskifacs.weebly.com/uploads/1/2/1/4/12143109/sewing_machine_parts_and_jobs.pdf)

“Threads: Understanding Thread Tension” (http://www.threadsmagazine.com/item/4302/understanding-thread-tension)

Some Basic Sewing Stitches

Some Basic Sewing Stitches

http://www.sewdresses.com/sew-dresses/sewing-how-to-sewing-easy-sewing-stitches

 

“Better Homes and Garden: Sewing Patterns and Tips for Beginners” (http://howtosew.com)

“Simplicity Creative Group: Sewing 101” (http://www.simplicity.com/t-sewing-101-part1.aspx)

“Skip to My Lou: Craft, Create and Celebrate” (http://www.skiptomylou.org/2009/07/17/how-to-make-a-simple-reversible-totebag)


 

Basic Sewing Class Activity

Textile Arts and Design 7

  • Unit 3 in Textile Arts and Design 7  is Textile Production Basics
  • General Curriculum Outcome: Students will be expected to develop competency in the selection and use of technological applications in textiles.
  • Specific Curriculum Outcome 3.1: Students will be expected to develop skills in the use of technology for sewing, threading and operating a sewing machine, using an iron, using a serger
  • Specific Curriculum Outcome 3.2: Students will be expected to apply sewing skills to a project and articulate what they have learned using sewing terminology

Methodology:

  • Students will participate in sewing machine activities. They will identify parts of a sewing machine and functions.  The following is an example of a handout. Sewing Machine Parts and their Jobs Handout. Students will be expected to thread a machine, sew a straight line, use reverse function, turn a corner, sew a curved line to achieve their “Sewing License.” Students can first practice such skills on  piece of paper with template according to task. This is called “Paper Stitching Exercise.” See example.
Paper Stitching Activity

Paper Stitching Activity

http://www.learningzonexpress.com/documents/worksheets/3316_see_n_sew_worksheet.pdf

Resources:

Standard

Assignment 6: Discharging Color


Discharging Color from a Piece of Linen with a Potato Stamp

Step 1

Step 1

I chose to try discharging on a piece of solid black linen as discharging works best on cellulose fibres that are of a solid color.

Start off by preparing your fabric. Iron the piece.

Step 2

Step 2

Prepare a stamp by slicing a potato in half and then carve the potato. Here, I made a heart shape.

Step 2 Continued

Step 2 Continued

Here, I made a zigzag to try and achieve a chevron pattern.

Step 3

Step 3

 

Step 3 Continued

Step 3 Continued

Prepare a “stamp pad” by pouring some bleach into a container and adding a few layers of paper towel.

Step 4

Step 4

Dab stamp into stamp pad.

Step 5

Step 5

Press stamp onto the fabric and hold for two to three seconds. You will the results of the bleach work right away.

Step 5 Continued

Step 5 Continued

 

Step 5

Step 5 Continued

 

 

Step 6

Step 6

Continue stamping to achieve desired results.

Step 6

Step 6 Continued

 

Step 6

Step 6 Continued

 

Step 6 Continued

Step 6 Continued

 

 


Discharging Color Results

The discharging activity worked according to plan. The results were a little more instantaneous than I anticipated which made for some instant gratification making the project all the more fun. The linen (cellulose based) really reacted to the bleach and lost its color quickly resulting in a brownish orange which contrasted nicely against the black.

 

Discharging Results

Discharging Results

 

Discharging Results

Discharging Results

 

Discharging Results

Discharging Results

 

Discharging Results

Discharging Results

 


 

Sources for Useful Instruction on Discharging Color

Threads: Dying with Bleach (http://www.threadsmagazine.com/item/3720/dyeing-with-bleach/page/all)

Discharging Dye with Bleach (https://www.google.ca/?gws_rd=ssl#q=discharging+color+with+bleach)

Discharging by Maiwa (http://www.maiwa.com/pdf/discharge.pdf)

“Plenty of Paprika: How to Stamp with Bleach on Fabric” (http://plentyofpaprika.blogspot.ca/2014/06/how-to-stamp-with-bleach-on-fabric.html)


Discharging Color Class Activity

Textile Arts and Design 7

  • Unit 1 in Textile Arts and Design 7  is “Textile Arts and Design.”
  • General Curriculum Outcome: Students will be expected to demonstrate the impact of textile art and design on our daily lives.
  • Specific Curriculum Outcome 1.2: Students will be expected to use an embellishment technique to add personal expression to a textile item.

Methodology:

  • Demonstrate their understanding of appropriate design choice by creating a design for clothing embellishment. Teacher will display samples or pictures of dying/ discharging.
  • Students identify their first impression created by the image.
  • Students will bring in a t- shirt to either dye or discharge.

Resources:

  • Nova Scotia Department of Education Curriculum: Textile Arts and Design 7 (Draft)
Standard

Assignment #5: Dyeing


Shibori Overview

  • For this project I decided to dabble in “Shibori.”
  • Shibori is resist dyeing where you cover up part of the fibre and the covered part will remain undyed (resist dye). Tie-dyeing is a form of Shibori. Shibori started in China dating back to seventh century where it  has been found in Japan, Eastern Europe, and Indonesia.

 Shibori Practice Directions Sample #1

Step 1

Step 1

Lay fabric flat and iron. You should consider a natural fibre for this project as this will produce best results when using Rit dye. Here, I have used a fabric swatch made from 100% cotton. Even though the label reads cotton, I conducted the burn test to reaffirm. The fabric swatch is a piece from an older t-shirt as I thought it was important to do a little experimenting practice before I start dyeing my wardrobe.

Step 2

Step 2

Fold fabric in accordion style (back and forth).

Step 3

Step 3

Now, fold in the other direction (lengthway) in accordion fashion.

 

Step 4

Step 4

 Begin clamping edges with binder clips.

Step 4 Continued

Step 4 Continued

 You can use as many as you  like.

Rit Dye

Rit Dye

Step 5

Step 5

Pour package of dye into plastic container.

Step 6

Step 6

Add hot water

Salt as a Morton

Salt

Step 7

Step 7

Add one cup of salt to the dye bath if you are using natural fibres such as cotton.

Step 7 Continued

Step 7 Continued

Stir the dye bath.

Step 8

Step 8

Place fabric in the dye bath, ensure it is completely submerged and time for 30 minutes. Stirring occasionally. After thirty minutes, remove fabric and rinse under warm then gradually cool water until the dye stops running. Wash in warm water with mild detergent then air dry or use dryer.

Results

Shibori Results (Binder Clip)

Shibori Results (Binder Clips)

Shibori Results (Binder Clip #2)

Shibori Results (Binder Clips #2)

Shibori Results (Binder Clips Close-up)

Shibori Results (Binder Clips Close-up)


 Shibori Practice Directions Sample #2

 

Shibori Square and Elastic

Steps 1, 2 and 3

Fold fabric in accordion style lengthwise and the other way. Then place a cut- out square made from cardboard on the front and back of the folded fabric and bind with rubber bands. This actual picture I had to find on the internet as I accidentally deleted the picture of my demonstration of this step. (The image was taken from http://honestlywtf.com/diy/shibori-diy). Next, please follow directions from Sample 1  demonstration steps 5 -8.

Results

Shibori Square and Elastic Results

Shibori Results (Sqaure and Elastics)

 

Shibori Square and Elastics Results (Close Up 3)

Shibori Results (Square and Elastics Close Up #1)

 

Shibori Square and Elastics Results (Close Up #2)

Shibori Results (Square and Elastics Close Up #2)

 


 

Shibori Practice Directions Sample #3

 

Step 1

Step 1

Fold accordion style.

Step 2

Step 2

Pinch and bind into equal sections.

Step 3

Step 3

Step 3 Continued

Step 3 Continued

Step 3 Continued

Step 3 Continued

Continue binding with elastics as many times as you can. Next, please follow directions from Sample 1  demonstration steps 5 -8.

Results

Shibori Elastic Results

Shibori Results (Elastic Binding)

Shibori Elastic Results (Close Up)

Shibori Results (Elastic Binding)

 


Overall Results

Shibori Results

Shibori Results

The dyeing assignment was a project I looked forward to delving into and I was quite pleased with the results. Resist dyeing is exciting yet trepidatious as the results are somewhat of a surprise until the great unveiling where you get to unravel and open your gift. I am feeling more confident that I can try such techniques on “real” clothes and my sister already put in the first order for a binder clip tank top.


Sources for Useful Instruction on Dyeing

An Introduction to Textile Terms (https://moodle.fp.tul.cz/pluginfile.php/142345/mod_page/content/10/TextileTerms-1.pdf)

World Shibori Network (http://shibori.org/traditions/techniques)

“Burda Style Dyeing Fabric: Shibori Techniques” (http://www.burdastyle.com/techniques/dyeing-fabric-shibori-techniques)

Shibori Techniques (http://www.cabrillo.edu/~vmay/Art21_shibori-techniques.pdf)

Color Theory Through Shibori by Heather M. Herche (http://heatherherche.weebly.com)

The Rit Studio: How to Dye Using the Shibori Pole- Wrapping Technique (https://www.ritstudio.com/techniques/creative-techniques/shibori-pole-wrapping)

“DIY Shibori” Honestly WTF  (http://honestlywtf.com/diy/shibori-diy)


Standard

Assignment 4: Textile Structures


Woven

Textile Structures Woven

Textile Structure Woven

 

  • This is a woven piece. It is appropriately used in this textile structure  as this is a suit jacket. For this garment, you want a pristine and crisp look at all times as this is sported in formal wear. The woven structure helps keep the shape of the garment intact as it does not stretch, bunch or bag. The exterior is made from 60% polyester, 30% wool, 10% viscose. The lining is made from 51% polyester and 49% polyamide
  • A woven textile structure is used to advantage garments in which you would like to maintain the shape so as to avoid any stretching or bagging after wear. The woven structure works for any piece you would like to keep the appearance looking crisp, such as uniforms, formal wear, jackets, etc. The woven piece usually require more work to achieve the freshly pressed and pristine look as it tends to wrinkle easier thank knit.
  • This textile structure might yield an unsatisfactory result if you are looking for comfort, stretch and movement in a garment. Sports, yoga and exercise apparel should know be woven as this textile structure offers little in the line of stretch so it would not offer a comfort during one’s workout regime.

 

Knit

Texttile Structures Knit

Textile Structure Knit

 

  • This is a knit piece and is appropriately used in this textile structure as this garment is a pair of yoga leggings.  The garment is fabricated from 87% nylon, 13% Lycra Spandex. Knit is looped together and allows for stretch and movement, thus, providing a comfortable workout outfit.
  • The knit textile structure might be used to advantage workout, yoga and exercise apparel. Movement causes pulling and tugging on fabric so having a piece that allows for some stretch while wearing will provide the ultimate experience in comfort. This is easy wearing and maintenance as it does not wrinkle as easily as a woven garment.
  • A knit textile structure might yield an unsatisfactory result if you are looking to present in a more formal situation where you are required to have a crisp and professional appearance. Knitted textiles tend to have a more relaxed and casual look so are not often appropriate in certain work contexts. Formal dresses are another example where you would not want the garment to stretch.

Felted

Textile Structures Felted

Textile Structures Felted

 

  • The felted textile structure is appropriate in this piece as slippers are created to provide warmth and comfort.
  • The felted textile structure might be used to advantage slippers as the wool provides warmth and a cozy feeling the wearer hopes to gain from sporting these. They are tightly felted which would provide ultimate warmth and durability for something you will wear and walk in quite frequently.
  • The felted textile structure might yield an unsatisfactory result if  a summer top or pant were fabricated from this. Constructing summer apparel from felted material would be much too warm and bulky.
  • Image from : http://itsbetterhandmade.com/red-color-sole-felt-wool-shoes-gray-yellow-custom-made-womens-sizes/

Pressed or Rolled (Synthetics)

Textile Structures Pressed or Rolled

Textile Structures Pressed or Rolled

 

  • This synthetic piece is made from 100% nylon and is appropriately used in this garment as it provides a wind and rain resistant shield. Nylon is a fibre that was used to imitate silk
  • The synthetic textile structure might be used to advantage because it is water repellent. It is created from pressing synthetic fibres together.   It is also easy care which makes it durable for outerwear. Sportswear is often made of nylon as it has some properties making it suitable for exterior  wear as an outer shell.
  • Examples where this textile structure might yield an unsatisfactory result when you want something plant based thus more breathable and airy on a hot summer day.

 


Sources for Useful Instruction on Textile Structures

The Structure of Textile Fabrics (http://ir.library.oregonstate.edu/xmlui/bitstream/handle/1957/24569/ECNO897.pdf?sequence=1)

Understanding Fabrics Guide (http://www.learningseed.com/_guides/1166_Understanding_Fabrics_Guide.pdf)

“Clothing & Textiles” (http://www.clothingandtextiles.org/a-needle-and-thread-blog)

“The Laundress Blog” (http://blog.thelaundress.com/wordpress/the-laundress-fabric-glossary)

“Fabric Link” (http://www.fabriclink.com/dictionaries/textile.cfm)


Textile Structure Class Activity

Textile Arts and Design 7

  • Unit 2 in Textile Arts and Design 7 is “The Clothing Consumer.”
  • General Curriculum Outcome: Students will be expected to use their knowledge of textiles to become more informed consumers
  • Specific Curriculum Outcome 2.2: Students will be expected to demonstrate an awareness of fibre and fabric construction techniques.

Methodology:

  • Teacher will present information on fabric construction methods : woven, knit, felted and pressed or rolled (synthetics). Next, teacher will lead a discussion on fabric selection, using clothing and household items as examples and will provide a variety of fabric samples.
  • Students will engaged in an interactive element and participate in a “Textile Structure Scavenger Hunt.” Divide the class into small groups and allow each group to gather as many items on the list as possible (i.e. woven garment, knit, felted, pressed or rolled, etc.) You may also incorporate previous content  as review into the list (i.e. pattern, line, texture, etc.). The purpose of the scavenger hunt is to encourage students to look closely at fabrics. Students are invited to use microscopes or large magnifying glasses to examine various fabric samples.
  • After the groups have located all pieces on their list they will be expected to examine the different qualities of fabric sample and will examine how the fabric is made.
  • Students will then match fabric and or garments to potential uses based on durability, care, function, cost, and appearance and will share findings with the class.

 

Resources

Standard

Assignment 3: Fibres


Fibre Identification Prediction and Results

Fibre Identification Prediction

Fibre Identification Prediction

Fibre Identification Results

Fibre Identification Results

 


 

Cellulose

 

Fibre Identification Cellulose

Fibre Identification Cellulose Results

 

 

Fibre Identification Sample Cellulose #1

Fibre Identification Sample Cellulose #1

  • This fabric burned quickly and left a glow when it was extinguished. The smoke was light in color, smelled like paper burning and left a soft ash.
  • I predicted this fabric was cellulose and the burn test supports this as the ash was soft and grey.
  • Fabrics from the cellulose category could be used for clothing such as blouses, dresses, shirts. It could also be used for diapers, towels, curtains, and upholstery.
  • Some considerations for washing, drying, ironing, storing and stain removal include: machine wash in hot water for white and warm or cold water for color fabrics. Some bright color fabrics can bleed in the wash so you can wash these separately. You can iron at high temperature while damp.
  • [“The Textile Rooms: Fibre Content Labelling” (http://www.textilerooms.com/tecnical/fibre%20content%20labelling/parte%20usa/fiber_fact.html) ]
Fibre Identification Sample Cellulose #2

Fibre Identification Sample Cellulose #2

  • This fabric burned quickly and left a glow when it was extinguished. The smoke was light in color, smelled like paper and left a soft ash.
  • Based on feel I predicted this fabric was cellulose and the burn test supports this as it left a soft grey ash.
  • Fabrics from the cellulose category could be used for clothing such as blouses, dresses, shirts. It could also be used for diapers, towels, curtains, and upholstery.
  • Some considerations for washing, drying, ironing, storing and stain removal include: machine wash in hot water for white and warm or cold water for color fabrics. Some bright color fabrics can bleed in the wash so you can wash these separately. You can iron at high temperature while damp.
  • [“The Textile Rooms: Fibre Content Labelling” (http://www.textilerooms.com/tecnical/fibre%20content%20labelling/parte%20usa/fiber_fact.html) ]

 

Fibre Identification Sample Cellulose #3

Fibre Identification Sample Cellulose #3

  • This fabric burned quickly and left a glow when it was extinguished. The smoke was light in color, smelled like paper and left a soft ash.
  • Based on feeling the fabric swatch I predicted this fabric was cellulose and the burn test supports this. The ash residue was light. However, after performing the burn test there was something about this fabric swatch which led me to believe it could be a blend of cellulose and synthetic.
  • Fabrics from the cellulose category could be used for clothing such as blouses, dresses, shirts. It could also be used for diapers, towels, curtains, and upholstery.
  • Some considerations for washing, drying, ironing, storing and stain removal include: machine wash in hot water for white and warm or cold water for color fabrics. Some bright color fabrics can bleed in the wash so you can wash these separately. You can iron at high temperature while damp.
  • [“The Textile Rooms: Fibre Content Labelling” (http://www.textilerooms.com/tecnical/fibre%20content%20labelling/parte%20usa/fiber_fact.html) ]

Protein

Fibre Identification Protein

Fibre Identification Protein Results

Sample Protein #4

Fibre Identification Sample Protein #4

  • This fibre burned slowly and curled away from the lighter. It self extinguished and smelled like burnt hair. The ash was very crushable and dark.
  • I predicted this fibre to be protein based on feel. The easily crushable ash was gritty and dark which supports my prediction this material was protein based.
  • Protein fibre may be used to knit sweaters, mittens, scarves, blankets, rugs, etc. as it is absorbent, soft, warm and dry. It is found in different weights. It can also be felted, woven/non-woven, and knit fabrics.
  • A lot of time it must be dry-cleaned, however, if the label directions recommend machine washable, use warm water and tumble dry. If hand washable, use cool water, reshape and lay flat to dry. Do not use bleach.
  • [“The Textile Rooms: Fibre Content Labelling” (http://www.textilerooms.com/tecnical/fibre%20content%20labelling/parte%20usa/fiber_fact.html) ]


Synthetics

Fibre Identification Synthetics

Fibre Identification Synthetics Results

 

Fibre Identification Sample Synthetics #6

Fibre Identification Sample Synthetics #5

  • The fibre burned very quickly and the smoke was dark . The fibre melted and dripped leaving behind a hard melted bead. I also had to extinguish this as it did not self extinguish.
  • The resulting ash residue corresponded with what I expected as I predicted this fabric was synthetic.
  • Synthetic fabric is used for a wide variety of clothing. For example, blouses, shirts, dresses, children’s wear, hosiery, underwear, pants, and suits. It is found in a range of woven and knitted fabrics. It is also found in blends with natural and other synthetic fibres.
  • Considerations for washing, drying, ironing, storing, stain removal for synthetic base fabrics include: Low maintenance wash and wear performance. Machine wash and dry at medium to low temperatures. You should hang right away and iron only if necessary. Pre treat oily stains. You can rinse in cold water to minimize wrinkling and use fabric softener to reduce static.
  • [“The Textile Rooms: Fibre Content Labelling” (http://www.textilerooms.com/tecnical/fibre%20content%20labelling/parte%20usa/fiber_fact.html) ]
Fibre Identification Sample Synthetics #6

Fibre Identification Sample Synthetics #6

  • This fabric swatch burned quickly producing a black smoke. The fabric shrunk away from the flame and melted producing a hard black drip.
  • Based on feel I predicted this fabric was cellulose based. However, this guess was wrong as the flame produced a dripping ash when burned which coincides with the characteristics of synthetics.
  • Synthetic fabric is used for a wide variety of clothing. For example, blouses, shirts, dresses, children’s wear, hosiery, underwear, pants, and suits. It is found in a range of woven and knitted fabrics. It is also found in blends with natural and other synthetic fibres.
  • Considerations for washing, drying, ironing, storing, stain removal for synthetic base fabrics include: Low maintenance wash and wear performance. Machine wash and dry at medium to low temperatures. You should hang right away and iron only if necessary. Pre treat oily stains. You can rinse in cold water to minimize wrinkling and use fabric softener to reduce static.
  • [“The Textile Rooms: Fibre Content Labelling” (http://www.textilerooms.com/tecnical/fibre%20content%20labelling/parte%20usa/fiber_fact.html) ]
Fibre Identification Sample Synthetics #7

Fibre Identification Sample Synthetics #7

  • This fabric piece lit and burned rather quick producing black smoke. It did not self extinguish and pulled away from the flame.
  • I predicted this to be in the cellulose category; more specifically silk. However, this guess was incorrect as the melting properties make it consistent with a synthetic fibre where burning the fabric formed a bead.
  • Synthetic fabric is used for a wide variety of clothing. For example, blouses, shirts, dresses, children’s wear, hosiery, underwear, pants, and suits. It is found in a range of woven and knitted fabrics. It is also found in blends with natural and other synthetic fibres.
  • Considerations for washing, drying, ironing, storing, stain removal for synthetic base fabrics include: Low maintenance wash and wear performance. Machine wash and dry at medium to low temperatures. You should hang right away and iron only if necessary. Pre treat oily stains. You can rinse in cold water to minimize wrinkling and use fabric softener to reduce static.
  • [“The Textile Rooms: Fibre Content Labelling” (http://www.textilerooms.com/tecnical/fibre%20content%20labelling/parte%20usa/fiber_fact.html) ]
Fibre Identification Sample Synthetics #8

Fibre Identification Sample Synthetics #8

  • This fabric swatch burned quickly creating black smoke. The fabric did shrink away from the flame and melted producing a plastic smell.
  • Based on the feel of the fabric piece, I predicted it was synthetic and based on the drippy ash that hardened, it is consistent with synthetic properties.
  • Synthetic fabric is used for a wide variety of clothing. For example, blouses, shirts, dresses, children’s wear, hosiery, underwear, pants, and suits. It is found in a range of woven and knitted fabrics. It is also found in blends with natural and other synthetic fibres.
  • Considerations for washing, drying, ironing, storing, stain removal for synthetic base fabrics include: Low maintenance wash and wear performance. Machine wash and dry at medium to low temperatures. You should hang right away and iron only if necessary. Pretreat oily stains. You can rinse in cold water to minimize wrinkling and use fabric softener to reduce static.
  • [“The Textile Rooms: Fibre Content Labelling” (http://www.textilerooms.com/tecnical/fibre%20content%20labelling/parte%20usa/fiber_fact.html) ]

 

Sources for Useful Instruction on Fibre Identification, Behaviors, Uses and Care

Textile Fibres Textile Fibres: Section 2″ Fabric Reference, Fourth Edition, by Mary Humphries. Published by Prentice Hall. Copyright © 2009 by Pearson Education, Inc. (http://wps.pearsoncustom.com/wps/media/objects/7608/7791478/FA110_Ch02.pdf)

Home Science in Daily Life Fibre to Fabric  (http://www.nios.ac.in/media/documents/SecHmscicour/english/Home%20Science%20(Eng)%20Ch-10.pdf)

“Fabric Link” (http://www.fabriclink.com)

“The Textile Rooms: Fibre Content Labelling” (http://www.textilerooms.com/tecnical/fibre%20content%20labelling/parte%20usa/fiber_fact.html)

Project Clothing Lessons (http://texas4-h.tamu.edu/files/2011/12/publications_projects_clothing_lesson3a.pdf)

Introduction to Fabric Science (http://download.nos.org/srsec321newE/321-E-Lesson-22.pdf)


  Fibre Types, Behaviors, Uses and Care Class Activity

Textile Arts and Design 7

  • Unit 2 in Textile Arts and Design 7 is “The Clothing Consumer.”
  • General Curriculum Outcome: Students will be expected to use their knowledge of textiles to become more informed consumers.
  • Specific Curriculum Outcome 2.1: Students will be expected to extend their knowledge of textiles to make informed decisions related to clothing selection and care.
  • Specific Curriculum Outcome 2.2: Students will be expected to demonstrate an awareness of fibre and fabric construction techniques.

Methodology:

  • Explain the care illustrated by the care symbols on a provided clothing label, demonstrate textile characteristics affecting care and use, and lead a discussion on the clothing care.
  • Provide a variety of fabric samples. Identify type of fabric construction from provided fabric samples.

Students will be expected to:

  • Examine different qualities of fabric samples and learn basic characteristics and care of cellulose, protein and synthetic fibres.
  • Examine how the fabric is made and match fabric swatches to uses.
  • Use “burn test,” microscope or large magnifying glass to examine various fabric samples.
  • For burn test, divide students into groups. Give each group a set of materials. Explain and review “Burn Test Observation Chart” and let each group make a prediction. See Project Clothing Lessons (http://texas4-h.tamu.edu/files/2011/12/publications_projects_clothing_lesson3a.pdf)
Burn Observation Chart

Burn Observation Chart

Reflection Questions

Reflection Questions

Resources

Standard

Assignment 2: Color Theory

Color Examples

Image

Kantha Throw

  • The harmony in this example can be found in the main colors, the reds and greens. They compliment one another quite well.
  • The combination of colors work as they are located across the color wheel from one another thus are known as complementary colors. They provide a nice balance. The throw encompasses warm and cool.
  • For me, they work because the red is a shade of red and the green is a shade of green. I would not like it if both colors were used at true saturation and we were dealing with a true red and green because we would be reminded of the Christmas motif as this is not intended to be a festive blanket.
Image

Orange Carton

  • On this container we see tinted hues of yellow. The picture and colors used produce harmony. The colors used are analogous and are also found in nature’s orange.
  • The combination of colors are comprised of warm yellows and oranges. The colors match well creating the sense of harmony in the packaging. The color combination of this packaging  may give the consumer the feeling that this would make a nice relaxing morning drink. The color choice is very warm and inviting like a nice glass of orange juice is intended to be.
  • The combination of the colors work because they are both analogous and are also a color scheme based in nature such as the inside of a freshly sliced orange exposing the various layers of color from the rind through to the fruit’s flesh.
Image

Three Quarter Sleeve Printed Top

  • The harmonies in this color combination reside in that the blues and greens are analogous in color and it is also a color scheme based on nature.
  • The combination of colors work because the blues used are next to each other on the color wheel and are therefore analogous. The hues are cool which create a very relaxing and serene feel. This sense of harmony is further achieved as the blues and light greens are reminiscent of colors based in nature such as tropical waters. This also provides a very tranquil effect.
  • It works because there is enough contrast between the colors even though the hues are analogous. The blue tends to dominate over the green thus creating the feeling of the ocean. The colors are located on a white background allowing the hues to stand on their own.
Image

Ketchup Bottle

  • The harmonies in the iconic Heinz ketchup bottle that make in a balanced experience are that the predominant players are complimentary colors. The red and green.
  • The red and green provide a balance of warm and cool. They are complimentary colors and are also a prevalent duo found in the nature scene. Tomatoes, apples, strawberries, raspberries, roses to name a few always adorn green leaves. These images found in nature help us to interpret the red and green as a harmonious pair. It tries to lead us into thinking ketchup is a natural condiment.
  • There is a high contrast between the red and green and because there is a scene depicted in nature on the label our mind does not jump to Christmas. The colors may also serve to benefit the product’s marketing scores as the the red and green colors provide contrast thus grabbing consumers attention.

Image

  • The harmony in this purse is achieved because the colors are analogous. The colors blend nicely and provide a cool appeal to the bag. All hues used are cool making the bag a calming accessory.
  • The colors works well because the bag is busy in texture and pattern so the fact that although there is at least three hues of blue- greens, the bag does not look too busy. The colors are also reminiscent of a tropical waters providing a tranquil feel.
  • If the bag had of used as many complementary colors as it did analogous colours, it would have been overload and the easy breezy effect the accessory has to offer would not be possible.

Sources for Instruction on Color Theory 

The ABC's of Art Color Theory

The ABC’s of Art Color Theory

The ABC's of Art Color Theory in Color

The ABC’s of Art Color Theory in Color

(http://awesomeartists.com/ART/mB&WHandoutTheABCsOfArtColorTheory.htm) & (http://awesomeartists.com/ART/mTheABCsOfArtColorTheory.htm)

Clothing & Textile Elements of Design (http://www.clothingandtextiles.org/uploads/5/5/5/6/5556885/elementsofdesign.pdf)

Color Theory Quick Reference Sheet (http://paper-leaf.com/blog/2010/01/color-theory-quick-reference-poster)

Elements of Color Worksheet

Elements of Color Worksheet

(http://media-cache-ec0.pinimg.com/originals/d6/27/4c/d6274c248d928b0a6254d5e6eec4e2cf.jpg)

Color Theory Through Shibori by Heather M. Herche (http://heatherherche.weebly.com)

“Design Notes Art 104: Design and Composition” (http://daphne.palomar.edu/design/cwheel.html)

“Color Theory” (http://www.johnlovett.com/colour.htm)

“The Psychology of Color” (http://holykaw.alltop.com/the-psychology-of-color-for-web-designers-inf)


  Color Theory Class Activity

Textile Arts and Design 7

  •  Unit 1 in Textile Arts and Design 7  is “Textile Arts and Design.”
  • General Curriculum Outcome: Students will be expected to demonstrate the impact of textile art and design on our daily lives.
  • Specific Curriculum Outcome 1.2: Students will be expected to use an embellishment technique to add personal expression to a textile item.

Methodology:

  • Review examples of the elements of design in preparation for design work with an emphasis on “colour.”
  • Review and have students apply the following terms to textile and color samples (i,e. harmonies, primary, secondary, tertiary, analogous, color scheme, warm and cool, etc.) Have students complete the “Elements of Color Worksheet.”
  • Define “embellishment” and display samples or pictures of embellishment ideas (i.e. embroidery, glue sequins, fabric crayons, dye, iron-on transfers, etc.)

Students will be expected to:

  • Students will find three examples of color combination and bring to class. Students must be prepared to comment on the colors using information from the color wheel.
  • Students are expected to prepare a proposal for embellishment of a textile (i.e. t-shirt, purse, scarf, etc.) Project proposal must be completed on paper by hand or the computer. The proposal must use embellishment and color. The proposal must explain color selection based on “Color Theory” in the finished design. Students will then create their design using the medium of their choice.

Resources:

Standard

Assignment 1: Elements of Design


Line 

in Textile Design

Pillow Cover Line

Pillow Cover Line

  • The textile used to create line in the pillow cover comes from strips of kantha. The zigzag line creates a chevron pattern. The zigzag lines create a visual interest adding a punch of zest to an otherwise ordinary sofa.
  • The zigzag lines create visual interest. The chevron print is very classic and on trend. The lines were created from recycled material.
  • Considering the use of the zigzag lines and multi-colors, it is clear there is  a lot visually to absorb.  The abundance of visual interest takes the eye more time to view in order catch the details. Too much of this pattern could cause an overload. Using strips of kantha in a zigzag pattern would be too busy for clothing, however, just the right amount can add to home decor.

 

Shirt Line

Shirt Line

  • The woven textile used in this women’s blouse make sense as although the stripes are narrow, they are vertical creating a slimming effect. The lines are clean and the blue and white are a nice refreshing contrast.
  • This example of line is used as an advantage as the long stripes are vertical which extends the eye gaze thus creating an elongated effect. The woven material help keep the lines straight and crisp.
  • If this line were horizontal it would create a more choppy view for the the eyes to follow thus not providing a flattering look. The slim lines would not work for a shirt fabricated from knitted material as the lines would distort, pull and stretch, thus losing their straight and narrow appeal.

 

Curtain Line

Curtain Line

  • The “scribble” line print curtain works in this piece because although the scribbles are quite loosely drawn, the curtains are long and can handle the print.
  • The curvy lines give a motion or swaying effect which makes me think of a breeze softy moving the fabric.
  • This pattern of line would not achieve such an effect or feeling of gentle swaying  movement if the print were done on a smaller scale. Also, the long curves would not work well if a smaller garment was created using the same large sized print.  The curves are too grand in nature and would not display the continuous waves of lines.

 

Towel Line

Bath Towel Line

  • The wide and colorful line lends nicely to a clean and bright bath towel.
  • The boldness of the line really packs a punch and makes it stand out. The equally spaced lines gives the user a chance to pull any of the colors for further accenting the bath space. The equally spaced lines are reminiscent of a beach ball or rainbow and to me create a happy ambiance.
  • These boldfaced lines would not suit every garment. I can not see this layout working well in clothing apparel for example. These lines would not prove any benefit worn either vertically or horizontally. Besides, no one wants to be mistaken for a beach ball.
Sweater Line

Sweater Line

  • The line in this garment elicits the varsity feel. It’s wide two-tone simplicity makes it easy for the eye to view.
  • Although the lines are horizontal, it is not an unflattering piece as the lines are bold enough that your eyes do not follow each line. You look at the lines more as a collective piece. The width would also work well on larger scale objects such as curtains. Although the fabric is a knit the lines are thick enough they do not change shape as easily when worn compared to a thinner line.
  • The chunky line would lose it’s form if too small a garment was created from this pattern.

 


Pattern

in Textile Design

Blouse Pattern

Blouse Pattern

  • The silk blouse adorns a small scale medallion pattern.  The repetition of the pattern print works well on silk because between the two it functions as a dressy piece. The silk helps play up the medallions more formal side. The simplicity of the all black print on the cream fabric also gives nod to formal wear.
  • This pattern would work well on many garment types. It works very well on clothing as the intricacies of the fabric and pattern can be appreciated. The medallions keep their shape nice using this woven fabric.
  • This medallion print might be too small for larger scale projects such as drapes as the elegance and the detail would get lost. If the medallion pattern was printed on a knit fabric the detail could get stretched and lost when worn by someone.
Cushion Pattern

Cushion Pattern

  • The pattern found in the cushion cover creates a very fun and vibrant canvas. The pattern can jive with other textiles in the room as the varying size diamonds and repetition of the pattern invite you to look at the piece as a collective unit. This is because in our mind’s eye we anticipate the continuation of the shapes.
  • This pattern works well on pillows, rugs and even some apparel. The continuation and shape of the pointy diamonds give a tribal or almost aztec feel.
  • Although this print could easily be paired with other patterns, textures and colors, it could also be overdone. Again, larger surfaces like sofa upholstery would be too much.
Tunic Pattern

Tunic Pattern

  • This cotton tri-color piece makes an easy pairing for many outfits. It’s small and unique design create a casual and easy look. It makes a lovely long shirt, skirt, dress or reusable grocery bag. It’s muted and neutral hue does not demand a lot of attention despite the entire surface being speckled with an almost polka dot barrage.
  • This pattern might be used to advantage any piece looking to boast a low- key look.
  • This pattern might yield an unsatisfactory result if one is aiming for something that really pops and stands out. The pattern is quite plain, tiny and some might even find monotonous or mundane.
Curtain Pattern

Curtain Pattern

  • This fun pattern yields a little sense of eclectic whimsy. The pattern looks almost like it was hand blocked into the fabric. To me it makes me think of a sliced orange with the division of the segmented parts. The roundness of the pattern gives off a friendly vibe.
  • The pattern can reside with other patterns in the room or stands out against a plain backdrop. For drapes the pattern suits almost any room in the house. It is done on woven fabric so it the pattern can not be stretched which would make it suitable for a skirt or bottom garments.
  • This pattern would best be suited for home décor leaving clothing and apparel off it’s repertoire.

 

Blouse Long Sleeve Pattern

Blouse Long Sleeve Pattern

  •  This trellis pattern is used on a satin three quarter length sleeve blouse. The shirt would be considered work attire and the pattern helps support the sophistication of the garment.
  • This works well on a woven blouse as it has a mature feel but the print would also do wonders on drapes and throw cushions for the kitchen or living space.
  • The trellis pattern would not work for casual or leisure wear. It would not suit a hooded sweatshirt or a pair of jogging pants. The pattern would not be suitable for knitted fabric as the lines would stretch and tweak the gridded design.

 

 Texture

in Textile Design

Throw Blanket Texture

Throw Blanket Texture

  • This throw oozes texture and is why I have it.
  • It is perfect for adding texture to an otherwise flat looking canvas such as a bed or couch. It’s texture provides a comfy and cozy feel making it a cuddly throw.
  • This is a loose knit and would not make a warm sweater or outerwear. The loose knit stretches and lets cold air in when faced with nature’s elements.

 

Linen Scarf Texture

Linen Scarf Texture

 

  • The light and crisp linen feel of this airy scarf makes it perfect for a spring and summer scarf. It is light weight yet provides just the right heaviness for the warmer months. It is soft to the touch making is a pleasure to wear.
  • The linen is light enough to wear even on a summer evening making it a go to accessory. It is woven making it stay in place when tied.
  • This fabric would fail as a cold and dreary winter scarf if you’re looking for something warm to snuggle up in.

 

Waffle Knit Sweater Texture

Waffle Knit Sweater Texture

  • This heavy duty 100% cotton waffle knit is heavy and lovely. It was purchased for a cold winter and did we need it. The sweater is soft but you can feel the waffle knit.
  • The weight of the sweater is impressive and the flexible grid make it a comfy fit. This texture is definitely tactile and visual.
  • The stretchiness of the fabric would yield an unsatisfactory result and would not make for good pants or any other garment needing to “stay up”such as socks. It is a heavy textile and would not be suited for the summer months.
Chambray Shirt Texture

Chambray Shirt Texture

  •  The light weight of this woven fabric makes it a nice choice for warm weather or it can be layered when the weather cools. It is 100% cotton and the way it is woven creates visual texture. There is a white woven throughout creating a cross-hatch look and feel.
  • This textile is so versatile in apparel. It is often found in women’s, men’s and children’s clothing. It works as shirts, dresses, pants and shorts.
  • It works as a dress but is probably a fabric that needs contrast worn against it when worn as a shirt or shorts because it is quite understated so is works well with other textures and a variety of colors.

 

Knitted Blanket Texture

Knitted Blanket Texture

  • This baby gift was knitted with soft yarn in pastel colors. The women who knitted this said it was an “egg carton” pattern her mother used to use. The dimply canvas provides visual and tactile texture making it a nice choice for little hands to touch.
  • The soft knit texture does make it a great choice for anything baby. It is loosely woven so it is light and airy.
  • This knitted piece would not be satisfactory for outdoor use in the cold. It is too loosely woven and thus would not provide much shelter from harsh climates.

Sources for Instruction on Elements of Design Sources 

Elements of Design Quick Reference Sheet (http://paper-leaf.com/blog/2011/02/elements-of-design-quick-reference-sheet)

“Clothing and Textiles: Utah State University Cooperative Extension” (http://www.clothingandtextiles.org/a-needle-and-thread-blog)

An Introduction to Textile Terms (http://www.textilemuseum.org/pdfs/textileterms.pdf)

Principles of Design (https://www.getty.edu/education/teachers/building_lessons/principles_design.pdf)

“Imagined Spaces: Scenic Design and the National Art Centre – The Elements of Design”(http://www.artsalive.ca/collections/imaginedspaces/index.php/en/learn-about/elementsandprinciples/elements-of-design)

“NHS Designs” (http://www.nhsdesigns.com/graphic/principles)

“John Lovett Watercolor and Mixed Media Artist” (http://www.johnlovett.com/test.htm)

“Incredible Art Department” (http://www.incredibleart.org/files/elements.htm)

The Elements of Design

The Elements of Design

Elements of Art

Elements of Art

 


 

Elements of Design Class Activity  

Textiles Arts and Design  7

  • Unit 1 in Textile Arts 7 is “Textile Arts and Design”
  • General Outcome: Students will be expected to demonstrate the impact of textile art and design on our daily lives.
  • Specific Curriculum Outcome 1.1: Students will be expected to demonstrate an understanding of the relationship between clothing choices and personal expression.

Students will be expected to:

  • choose/create illustrations of clothing intended to give a particular impression
  • share their reflections on clothing selection and the impression it is intended to create

Methodology:

  • Review that clothing and accessories are personal statements of who we are. Have students brainstorm some idea regarding this and share with class.
  • – cultural expression, age, peer pressure/conformity, individuality, social class and group associations
  • Provide picture example for each on the projector
  • Show the You Tube video “100 Years/ Style/ East London.” It shows 100 years of style in 100 seconds.
  • http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7JxfgId3XTs
  • Explain and show examples of the elements of design in preparation for design work.
  • – line, shape, space, texture, colour
  • Distribute article, “Clothing and Textile Elements of Design” (see resources)
  • Create a word wall of design terms
  • Teacher will show some examples on the projector of elements of design.
  • Students can compile a collection of pictures showing “personal expression” through clothing. Students must also note and comment on Elements of Design. Students can then share their findings with the class.
  • Students will then create a creature to show personal expression and the elements of design.  Students may use a variety of medium: paper, pencil, fabric scraps, paint, computer art.

Example:

Elements of Design from Utah State University Cooperative Extension Program

Elements of Design from Utah State University Cooperative Extension Program

 

Clothing and Textiles Utah State University Cooperative Extension

Clothing and Textiles Utah State University Cooperative Extension

  • Students will present their creature to the class and explain how they infused the elements of design into their design.
  • As a cumulative project, the students will create their own reflection of their personal style and share their clothing preference ideologies with the class.

Resources:

Standard