Assignment 3: Fibres


Fibre Identification Prediction and Results

Fibre Identification Prediction

Fibre Identification Prediction

Fibre Identification Results

Fibre Identification Results

 


 

Cellulose

 

Fibre Identification Cellulose

Fibre Identification Cellulose Results

 

 

Fibre Identification Sample Cellulose #1

Fibre Identification Sample Cellulose #1

  • This fabric burned quickly and left a glow when it was extinguished. The smoke was light in color, smelled like paper burning and left a soft ash.
  • I predicted this fabric was cellulose and the burn test supports this as the ash was soft and grey.
  • Fabrics from the cellulose category could be used for clothing such as blouses, dresses, shirts. It could also be used for diapers, towels, curtains, and upholstery.
  • Some considerations for washing, drying, ironing, storing and stain removal include: machine wash in hot water for white and warm or cold water for color fabrics. Some bright color fabrics can bleed in the wash so you can wash these separately. You can iron at high temperature while damp.
  • [“The Textile Rooms: Fibre Content Labelling” (http://www.textilerooms.com/tecnical/fibre%20content%20labelling/parte%20usa/fiber_fact.html) ]
Fibre Identification Sample Cellulose #2

Fibre Identification Sample Cellulose #2

  • This fabric burned quickly and left a glow when it was extinguished. The smoke was light in color, smelled like paper and left a soft ash.
  • Based on feel I predicted this fabric was cellulose and the burn test supports this as it left a soft grey ash.
  • Fabrics from the cellulose category could be used for clothing such as blouses, dresses, shirts. It could also be used for diapers, towels, curtains, and upholstery.
  • Some considerations for washing, drying, ironing, storing and stain removal include: machine wash in hot water for white and warm or cold water for color fabrics. Some bright color fabrics can bleed in the wash so you can wash these separately. You can iron at high temperature while damp.
  • [“The Textile Rooms: Fibre Content Labelling” (http://www.textilerooms.com/tecnical/fibre%20content%20labelling/parte%20usa/fiber_fact.html) ]

 

Fibre Identification Sample Cellulose #3

Fibre Identification Sample Cellulose #3

  • This fabric burned quickly and left a glow when it was extinguished. The smoke was light in color, smelled like paper and left a soft ash.
  • Based on feeling the fabric swatch I predicted this fabric was cellulose and the burn test supports this. The ash residue was light. However, after performing the burn test there was something about this fabric swatch which led me to believe it could be a blend of cellulose and synthetic.
  • Fabrics from the cellulose category could be used for clothing such as blouses, dresses, shirts. It could also be used for diapers, towels, curtains, and upholstery.
  • Some considerations for washing, drying, ironing, storing and stain removal include: machine wash in hot water for white and warm or cold water for color fabrics. Some bright color fabrics can bleed in the wash so you can wash these separately. You can iron at high temperature while damp.
  • [“The Textile Rooms: Fibre Content Labelling” (http://www.textilerooms.com/tecnical/fibre%20content%20labelling/parte%20usa/fiber_fact.html) ]

Protein

Fibre Identification Protein

Fibre Identification Protein Results

Sample Protein #4

Fibre Identification Sample Protein #4

  • This fibre burned slowly and curled away from the lighter. It self extinguished and smelled like burnt hair. The ash was very crushable and dark.
  • I predicted this fibre to be protein based on feel. The easily crushable ash was gritty and dark which supports my prediction this material was protein based.
  • Protein fibre may be used to knit sweaters, mittens, scarves, blankets, rugs, etc. as it is absorbent, soft, warm and dry. It is found in different weights. It can also be felted, woven/non-woven, and knit fabrics.
  • A lot of time it must be dry-cleaned, however, if the label directions recommend machine washable, use warm water and tumble dry. If hand washable, use cool water, reshape and lay flat to dry. Do not use bleach.
  • [“The Textile Rooms: Fibre Content Labelling” (http://www.textilerooms.com/tecnical/fibre%20content%20labelling/parte%20usa/fiber_fact.html) ]


Synthetics

Fibre Identification Synthetics

Fibre Identification Synthetics Results

 

Fibre Identification Sample Synthetics #6

Fibre Identification Sample Synthetics #5

  • The fibre burned very quickly and the smoke was dark . The fibre melted and dripped leaving behind a hard melted bead. I also had to extinguish this as it did not self extinguish.
  • The resulting ash residue corresponded with what I expected as I predicted this fabric was synthetic.
  • Synthetic fabric is used for a wide variety of clothing. For example, blouses, shirts, dresses, children’s wear, hosiery, underwear, pants, and suits. It is found in a range of woven and knitted fabrics. It is also found in blends with natural and other synthetic fibres.
  • Considerations for washing, drying, ironing, storing, stain removal for synthetic base fabrics include: Low maintenance wash and wear performance. Machine wash and dry at medium to low temperatures. You should hang right away and iron only if necessary. Pre treat oily stains. You can rinse in cold water to minimize wrinkling and use fabric softener to reduce static.
  • [“The Textile Rooms: Fibre Content Labelling” (http://www.textilerooms.com/tecnical/fibre%20content%20labelling/parte%20usa/fiber_fact.html) ]
Fibre Identification Sample Synthetics #6

Fibre Identification Sample Synthetics #6

  • This fabric swatch burned quickly producing a black smoke. The fabric shrunk away from the flame and melted producing a hard black drip.
  • Based on feel I predicted this fabric was cellulose based. However, this guess was wrong as the flame produced a dripping ash when burned which coincides with the characteristics of synthetics.
  • Synthetic fabric is used for a wide variety of clothing. For example, blouses, shirts, dresses, children’s wear, hosiery, underwear, pants, and suits. It is found in a range of woven and knitted fabrics. It is also found in blends with natural and other synthetic fibres.
  • Considerations for washing, drying, ironing, storing, stain removal for synthetic base fabrics include: Low maintenance wash and wear performance. Machine wash and dry at medium to low temperatures. You should hang right away and iron only if necessary. Pre treat oily stains. You can rinse in cold water to minimize wrinkling and use fabric softener to reduce static.
  • [“The Textile Rooms: Fibre Content Labelling” (http://www.textilerooms.com/tecnical/fibre%20content%20labelling/parte%20usa/fiber_fact.html) ]
Fibre Identification Sample Synthetics #7

Fibre Identification Sample Synthetics #7

  • This fabric piece lit and burned rather quick producing black smoke. It did not self extinguish and pulled away from the flame.
  • I predicted this to be in the cellulose category; more specifically silk. However, this guess was incorrect as the melting properties make it consistent with a synthetic fibre where burning the fabric formed a bead.
  • Synthetic fabric is used for a wide variety of clothing. For example, blouses, shirts, dresses, children’s wear, hosiery, underwear, pants, and suits. It is found in a range of woven and knitted fabrics. It is also found in blends with natural and other synthetic fibres.
  • Considerations for washing, drying, ironing, storing, stain removal for synthetic base fabrics include: Low maintenance wash and wear performance. Machine wash and dry at medium to low temperatures. You should hang right away and iron only if necessary. Pre treat oily stains. You can rinse in cold water to minimize wrinkling and use fabric softener to reduce static.
  • [“The Textile Rooms: Fibre Content Labelling” (http://www.textilerooms.com/tecnical/fibre%20content%20labelling/parte%20usa/fiber_fact.html) ]
Fibre Identification Sample Synthetics #8

Fibre Identification Sample Synthetics #8

  • This fabric swatch burned quickly creating black smoke. The fabric did shrink away from the flame and melted producing a plastic smell.
  • Based on the feel of the fabric piece, I predicted it was synthetic and based on the drippy ash that hardened, it is consistent with synthetic properties.
  • Synthetic fabric is used for a wide variety of clothing. For example, blouses, shirts, dresses, children’s wear, hosiery, underwear, pants, and suits. It is found in a range of woven and knitted fabrics. It is also found in blends with natural and other synthetic fibres.
  • Considerations for washing, drying, ironing, storing, stain removal for synthetic base fabrics include: Low maintenance wash and wear performance. Machine wash and dry at medium to low temperatures. You should hang right away and iron only if necessary. Pretreat oily stains. You can rinse in cold water to minimize wrinkling and use fabric softener to reduce static.
  • [“The Textile Rooms: Fibre Content Labelling” (http://www.textilerooms.com/tecnical/fibre%20content%20labelling/parte%20usa/fiber_fact.html) ]

 

Sources for Useful Instruction on Fibre Identification, Behaviors, Uses and Care

Textile Fibres Textile Fibres: Section 2″ Fabric Reference, Fourth Edition, by Mary Humphries. Published by Prentice Hall. Copyright © 2009 by Pearson Education, Inc. (http://wps.pearsoncustom.com/wps/media/objects/7608/7791478/FA110_Ch02.pdf)

Home Science in Daily Life Fibre to Fabric  (http://www.nios.ac.in/media/documents/SecHmscicour/english/Home%20Science%20(Eng)%20Ch-10.pdf)

“Fabric Link” (http://www.fabriclink.com)

“The Textile Rooms: Fibre Content Labelling” (http://www.textilerooms.com/tecnical/fibre%20content%20labelling/parte%20usa/fiber_fact.html)

Project Clothing Lessons (http://texas4-h.tamu.edu/files/2011/12/publications_projects_clothing_lesson3a.pdf)

Introduction to Fabric Science (http://download.nos.org/srsec321newE/321-E-Lesson-22.pdf)


  Fibre Types, Behaviors, Uses and Care Class Activity

Textile Arts and Design 7

  • Unit 2 in Textile Arts and Design 7 is “The Clothing Consumer.”
  • General Curriculum Outcome: Students will be expected to use their knowledge of textiles to become more informed consumers.
  • Specific Curriculum Outcome 2.1: Students will be expected to extend their knowledge of textiles to make informed decisions related to clothing selection and care.
  • Specific Curriculum Outcome 2.2: Students will be expected to demonstrate an awareness of fibre and fabric construction techniques.

Methodology:

  • Explain the care illustrated by the care symbols on a provided clothing label, demonstrate textile characteristics affecting care and use, and lead a discussion on the clothing care.
  • Provide a variety of fabric samples. Identify type of fabric construction from provided fabric samples.

Students will be expected to:

  • Examine different qualities of fabric samples and learn basic characteristics and care of cellulose, protein and synthetic fibres.
  • Examine how the fabric is made and match fabric swatches to uses.
  • Use “burn test,” microscope or large magnifying glass to examine various fabric samples.
  • For burn test, divide students into groups. Give each group a set of materials. Explain and review “Burn Test Observation Chart” and let each group make a prediction. See Project Clothing Lessons (http://texas4-h.tamu.edu/files/2011/12/publications_projects_clothing_lesson3a.pdf)
Burn Observation Chart

Burn Observation Chart

Reflection Questions

Reflection Questions

Resources

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8 thoughts on “Assignment 3: Fibres

  1. Catherine Morley says:

    This is an excellent blog post; I think you’ll be able to use it again in your teaching. You might want to make the photos bigger for that purpose to celebrate your systematic and thoughtful study of fibre types. I thought it was very interesting how some of your predictions turned out to be incorrect.The Burn Test is so helpful to know how to proceed with one’s projects; foundational in dyeing! I have been surprised twice this summer making pieces out of what I thought were cottons only to find they were synthetics. Sad from the point of view of wanting a cool cotton to wear; happy from an ease of fabric car perspective.
    Cathy

    • Thank you Cathy. Making the images bigger is a great suggestion so I can use this as a teaching tool. I think it’s nice for students to see our little mishaps or mistakes so they know it is all part of the learning process. I now understand how you could have been easily deceived when you thought you were working with cottons only to discover they were synthetics.

  2. Brenda Aitchison says:

    I really enjoyed your assignment, especially the links to the curriculum outcomes. I’m not totally up on the outcomes as I’ve never taught FST (yet) but I have helped out quite a bit with the grade 7 Textiles unit. Finding out that cottons are not cottons makes me very suspicious of the textiles we buy and pay good money for. I wonder if there are any people who take a lighter in to the fabric store (believe me- I would never do that- but I can understand the suspicion and wanting to test the fabric).

    • That is such an excellent point and one I never gave very much thought to until working on this assignment. Perhaps there are people who do not believe what the label says until they conduct the test for themselves.

  3. Julie says:

    Brenda you could always get a sample cut for free, which the stores do, and then go out in the parking lot and light them! Jodi, the burn observation chart would be useful if analyzing many fabrics at once.

  4. Catherine Morley says:

    I think I mentioned that I had a classmate in the textile arts program (or possibly one of our professors?) who would take threads from the end of bolts of cloth (what she was interested in purchasing) and do a burn test in the parking lot (as Julie described). Julie also had a good point that fabric stores will cut you a tiny swatch upon request. It saves disappointment later with dyeing, and fabric care (such as melting a garment with a too hot iron when one thinks what one has in cotton!!!) That is the voice of experience talking.

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